front of house staff

The best restaurateurs know that it takes more than a good restaurant menu to bring guests in the door. Every year, new restaurant industry trends shape and reshape the industry, and staying ahead of those trends is the difference between a restaurant that succeeds and one of the many that fail every year.

With all of the signs are pointing towards guest enthusiasm towards restaurants, profit and success, some might say that staff turnover is the Achilles Heel of the industry – the biggest challenge restaurant owners face today. And “some” might be right. The loss of an employee at your restaurant is more than just a change in your staff. In fact, it’s all of these things:

  1. Cost: In time and money for hiring a new employee (e.g. advertisements, your time, the time of staff that you may use for interviewing, etc.)
  2. Shift Changes: Without proper notice, the loss of an employee can be disastrous to your shift scheduling
  3. Training: Exposure to your restaurant and its operations is essential to onboarding a new employee. The cost of this is both time and money.
  4. Customer Experience: Ramping up a new employee takes time and that can sometimes mean a dip in the customer experience in your restaurant while new employees get up to speed.

When looking at that list, think about the cost involved, in dollars and cents. On average, the cost of hiring an hourly employee (such as a restaurant employee) can be as much as $3,500. For your industry, that’s an investment that walks out the door nearly 50% of the time.

With all of that in mind, it’s more important than ever to understand the staffing trends in the industry – it may be your ticket to overcoming the challenges!

Turnover1

1. Labor Challenges Are Emerging (Again)

The U.S. economy is on the rise, which means unemployment rates are going down – and restaurants are having more trouble recruiting and retaining their employees. For the 15th year in 2014, restaurant employment growth outpaced overall employment growth in the private sector.  A gap between open positions and available candidates is the consequence. In other words, you’ll need more staff and the candidates simply won’t exist. According to the NRA, “Recruitment and retention of employees continue to strengthen as a top challenge for restaurant operators in 2017. As the economy keeps improving and employment levels rise, there is more competition for qualified employees to fill vacant restaurant positions.”

Restaurant Industry Report: Staff Turnover Statistics

2. Employee Turnover Is Rising

Recruitment is not the only challenge restaurant owners face as a result of the improving economy. When jobs were more scarce, people were less likely to leave their existing jobs. Now, an improved economy means employees are more likely to leave (and leaving existing jobs faster for new opportunities). Coupled with the fact that restaurant turnover is always higher than the overall private sector and you have a recipe for disaster.

 

“Currently, four in 10 restaurant employees are aged 16-24, however, the number of job seekers in that age group is shrinking.”

 

Restaurant staff management just got easier, employee turnover just became a thing of the past.

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What’s more than that? Upserve’s 2018 State of the Industry of the Industry Report found restaurant staffing levels and turnover weren’t the only challenge or staffing trend to watch out for.

“According to data pulled over the July through September 2017 period, restaurateurs’ staffing turnover challenges continued. But there were some intriguing findings in the data. For instance, an employee’s position was a greater signal of turnover than region or even base pay. Unsurprisingly, roles with greater responsibility (management, servers, kitchen staff) saw lower relative turnover than more transient positions (bussers and runners, catering staff, cashiers).

restaurant staff turnover rate

Restaurateurs shouldn’t expect much relief in the kitchen or on the floor, though. While servers and kitchen staff were among the lowest turnover rates (28%), that remains a troubling churn rate for most restaurants in a tight labor market.”

Some other data-driven insights from the report you’ll want to hear about:

  • Weekly turnover rates increased from July to September on a weekly basis.
  • An employee’s position in the restaurant is a greater signal of turnover risk than region.
  • Pay rates were highest in the West and lowest in the South, and that gap is likely to increase in 2018.
  • Base pay rate has little impact on turnover.

Bottom line: Good help is hard to find, even harder to keep. Download the full report here.

 

3. The Labor Pool Is Shrinking (And Aging)

As if turnover and labor challenges are not enough, a shrinking and aging labor pool is going to make hiring much different. Currently, four in 10 restaurant employees are aged 16-24, however, the number of people in that age group who are looking for jobs in the industry is shrinking. This prime age group is participating less, which means restaurateurs will have to look elsewhere… like to the aging population and workforce. This means a change in how you hire, and how you incentivize your restaurant staff.

The long and short of it is this: employee turnover is on the rise, and it doesn’t look as if it will decrease anytime soon – which means there will be changes in hiring restaurant staff from all aspects. How you respond will make or break you

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In a perfect world, Theresa would spend her days reading good books and writing all the time... and she'd own all the shoes her heart desired. When she's not on the hunt for shoes, you can find this Rhode Island transplant on the hunt for food that comes close to "Long Island". Her favorite? Caffe Dolce Vita in Providence's historic Federal Hill.